Court adjourns hearing in dissolving FJP to July 22

 

The Supreme Administrative Court decided in its first session to adjourn hearing the case regarding dissolving the political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood group — the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) — to July 22, state-owned Al-Ahram newspaper reported on Saturday.

 

The Party Affairs Committee requested that the court dissolve the FJP and confiscate its financial assets, after presenting evidence from Homeland Security investigations proving that the party violated the law in organizing its affairs.

 

According to the same law, the court is obliged to issue a verdict in one month.

 

But FJP lawyer Mahmoud Abu al-Einien said in front of the court that the law regarding the organization of the affairs of political parties is void, as it was not revised by the legislations committee of the State Council, which contradicts articles 63 and 66 of the State Council Law, obliging all legislators to present draft laws in front of the legislations committee prior to their passing.

 

The State Commissioners Authority (SCA) had recommended that the party be dissolved and its assets confiscated.

 

This lawsuit is one of several others demanding the dissolution of the party due to its alleged involvement in terrorism, following the declaration of its mother organization — the Muslim Brotherhood — a terrorist organization by a court in September.

 

A military-backed interim government then launched a campaign to seize the financial assets of the organization, confiscating the property and funds of hundreds of NGOs and companies said to have connections to the Brotherhood.

 

The Ministry of Social Solidarity suspended over a thousand NGOs, while a government-backed committee presented to the prosecution a list including 737 Brotherhood leaders on accusations of “financing terrorism.” The same committee seized hundreds of companies owned by Brotherhood leaders and confiscated their assets, the latest of which was a decision to freeze the assets of 66 companies owned by the group’s tycoons Khairat al-Shater and Hassan Malek.

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