Poll: 35% blame Brothers for bombing
Bombing in Mansoura
 

Thirty-five percent of Egyptians believe that the Muslim Brotherhood is behind the bombing that targeted Daqahlia Security Directorate on Tuesday, killing 16 and injuring more than 130, according to an independent poll.

In Daqahlia, the governorate where the attack occurred, 42 percent of those surveyed said they believed the Muslim Brotherhood was responsible for the blast. The poll was conducted by the Egyptian Center for Public Opinion Research, known as Baseera, hours after the bombing and jihadi group Ansar Beit al-Maqdes claimed responsibility in a statement Wednesday.

Ansar Beit al-Maqdes said it was targeting police for their heavy-handed response to Islamist protesters since President Mohamed Morsi was removed from office in July. Hundreds were killed in the crackdown and thousands of others injured or arrested.

Overall, 46 percent of respondents said they did not know who the perpetrators were, while 6 percent pointed to Ansar Beit al-Maqdes and 5 percent to other jihadi groups.

This radical underground group, which has reportedly been operating out of the Sinai Peninsula, expanded its operations to strike at the state target in the Nile Delta city of Mansoura Tuesday.

The percentage of those who believe that the Brotherhood is behind the attack is higher among those who hold university degrees, at 44 percent.

Urban residents tend to blame the Muslim Brotherhood more than their rural counterparts do — 39 percent compared to 31 percent.

According to the poll, 91 percent of Egyptians are aware of the bombing.

In another poll conducted by Baseera 10 days ago, 46 percent of those surveyed said they approve of reconciliation talks between the government and the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood.

A much lower percentage, 19 percent, approved of a return of the Muslim Brotherhood to the political scene, while 35 percent of respondents said that the Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party should be allowed to take part in upcoming parliamentary elections.

AD