Egypt, Cyprus discuss new agreements for gas excavation, aviation
Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades
 

Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades arrived in Cairo for a two-day visit on Thursday, meeting with interim President Adly Mansour to develop bilateral relations between Egypt and Cyprus, reported the independent newspaper Al-Shorouk.

The delegation from Cyprus included the ministers of tourism, foreign affairs, power and trade.

In addition to meeting with Mansour, the Cypriots met with an Egyptian delegation including Defense Minister Colonel General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and the ministers of tourism, trade and production, power and civil aviation.

Petroleum Minister Sherif Ismail said Thursday that the countries planned to sign an agreement on exchanging information in regards to the discovery and sharing of natural gas fields in the waters between Egypt and Cyprus, said the privately owned Al-Masry Al-Youm.

In a presser held Thursday evening, Prime Minister Hazem al-Beblawi confirmed that the two governments would sign agreements regarding natural gas excavation and aviation services, but denied previous reports that Egypt would export Israeli natural gas via Cyprus.

In a presser held Thursday afternoon, he added that relations with the European Union are starting to return to normal as other nations realize Egypt is staying steady on its roadmap to a transition of power.

“Egypt wishes to help alleviate tension between Turkey, Greece and Cyprus. We support peaceful solutions,” Beblawi continued, reiterating Egypt’s support for Cyprus.

Cyprus and Turkey have been in an ongoing conflict since 1974 after Turkey occupied Cyprus’ northern territories.

Egyptian and Turkish relations have deteriorated in the months following the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsi. In November, Egypt expelled the Turkish ambassador in response to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s call for Morsi’s release.

AD

You have a right to access accurate information, be stimulated by innovative and nuanced reporting, and be moved by compelling storytelling.

Subscribe now to become part of the growing community of members who help us maintain our editorial independence.
Know more

Join us

Your support is the only way to ensure independent,
progressive journalism
survives.