State union federation to support constitution

The Egyptian Trade Union Federation (ETUF) is mobilizing for a “yes” vote on the constitution, despite objecting to the cancelation of the 50 percent quota for workers and farmers in parliament, state-owned newspaper Al-Ahram reported.

The federation maintains that canceling the workers’ quota is a violation of their rights, and that the constitution should not disregard 70 percent of the population, especially after two revolutions. Despite its reservations, it is pushing for a “yes” vote in order to support the roadmap devised by the Armed Forces.

Last month, Ibrahim withdrew from the 50-member committee in protest over the decision to scrap the workers’ and farmers’ quota, saying that it would marginalize Egyptian workers. He added that he would call on them to vote against the constitution.

During a press conference Sunday, head of ETUF Abdel Fattah Ibrahim, maintained that the federation would continue to stand by workers and fight for their rights, criticizing policies that he maintains are harmful to the sector.

Al-Ahram reported that members of the federation concluded the meeting by chanting, “Yes to the constitution,” and “The workers are one hand.”

Karam Saber, a labor analyst and director of the Land Center for Human Rights, told Mada Masr that the ETUF never had the interests of workers as its priority, adding that the Land Center is yet to decide on its stance regarding the constitution.

Saber said, while some think they should vote “yes,” others believe there is still room for pressure to change some of the articles.

The center will hold a meeting on December 12 to decide on its position, he stated.

AD

You have a right to access accurate information, be stimulated by innovative and nuanced reporting, and be moved by compelling storytelling.

Subscribe now to become part of the growing community of members who help us maintain our editorial independence.
Know more

Join us

Your support is the only way to ensure independent,
progressive journalism
survives.